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Posted by sally

‘Based on a decade of field research, Barbara Owen will discuss her co-authored book In Search of Safety. The authors argue that intersectional inequalities and cumulative disadvantages are at the root of the gendered harms that both mirror women’s pathways to prison and constrain their experience while confined. Women must negotiate these inequities by developing forms of prison capital—social, human, cultural, emotional, and economic—to ensure their safety while inside. This conflict and subsequent violence result from human-rights violations inside the prison that occur within the gendered context of substandard prison conditions, inequalities of capital among those imprisoned, and relationships with correctional staff. By claiming such gendered harms are a form of state-sponsored suffering, In Search of Safety proposes a way forward—the implementation of international human-rights standards – The Bangkok and the Mandela Rules– for all women’s prisons.’

Date: 26th October 2017, 6.00-7.00pm

Location: Eng 1.03, Malet Place Engineering Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

Charge: Free, registration required

More information can be found here.

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Roma are charged by Uefa after some of their fans were heard making "monkey chants" towards Chelsea defender Antonio Rudiger.
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Posted by Jamie Grierson

In latest Twitter outburst US president makes terror link even though annual crime figures record all police-recorded offences

Donald Trump has erroneously linked a rise in recorded crime in the UK to the “spread of radical Islamic terror” in his latest outburst on Twitter.

“Just out report: ‘United Kingdom crime rises 13% annually amid spread of Radical Islamic terror.’ not good, we must keep America safe!” wrote the US president.

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Posted by Angela Monaghan

A rise in tax receipts contributed to the lowest government borrowing since 2007, handing the chancellor Philip Hammond a boost before next month’s budget

Investors across Europe remain in an upbeat mood this mood, with the FTSE 100 still in with a chance of a new closing high (7,556.24 is the number to beat).

Britain’s manufacturers are encouraged by what they consider to be progress on Brexit talks after Theresa May’s trip to Brussels for the EU leaders summit.

But more needs to be done, cautioned Terry Scuoler, chief executive of the manufacturers’ trade body, EEF:

The warmer words emerging from the European Council following the approach adopted by the Prime Minister suggest there is a glimmer of light at the end of this tunnel.

Business needs to see more than a hint of progress, however, because serious planning for transitional arrangements should be taking place now if companies are to firm up their business plans and pin down investment.

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Posted by Sarah Solemani

The Harvey Weinstein scandal puts us at a crossroads. Can we remake the industry?

My first experience of sexism in showbusiness came early, when I was 19. I was invited to the director’s house for dinner, just the two of us. He cooked. It was delicious. He’d had practice, to be fair, being in his 50s. After dinner he asked how I felt about nudity. Another role in the project we were working on had involved nudity, so it didn’t feel a strange question, being 19 and ever so keen.

“Oh, but your story needed it,” I gushed. “It was brilliantly done.”

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Posted by Amelia Hill

Leah Waterman was earlier told she must return to Philippines, leaving severely disabled husband to care for children

The wife of a British stroke victim told by the Home Office that he must become the sole carer for their two young children has been told she will receive a right to remain visa after the Guardian highlighted their plight.

The Home Office had previously insisted Leah Waterman had to return to the Philippines, leaving her husband, Simon – who uses a wheelchair, requires 24-hour supervision to keep him alive and cannot speak, write or reliably understand what is said to him – as the sole carer for their two young British children.

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Posted by Sandeep Parmar

This year’s lineup may be deserving, but with just one collection by a BAME poet in an exceptionally strong year for poets of colour, it also seems naive

Over the past few years, challenges to British poetry’s lack of diversity have made it impossible to return to the status quo – or so we thought. This year’s TS Eliot prize shortlist, announced on Thursday, features just one collection (out of 10, including Michael Symmons Roberts and Leontia Flynn) by a poet of colour, the much-acclaimed Night Sky with Exit Wounds by Ocean Vuong. For those who have championed crucial interventions in poetry publishing, reviewing and prizes, this nearly all-white shortlist cannot help but seem inexplicably naive and regressive.

This year was an exceptionally strong year for British poets of colour, and you would have reasonably expected to see Kayo Chingonyi, Richard Georges, André Naffis-Sahely, Nick Makoha, Nuar Alsadir, or Elizabeth-Jane Burnett here, among several others.

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Posted by Alex Hern

Funding round led by CapitalG takes valuation of ride-hailing company up to $11bn

The US ride-hailing company Lyft has secured a $1bn (£760m) investment from a Google-led consortium, a considerable war chest that will help finance its challenge to Uber in the US – and possibly overseas.

The funding round was led by CapitalG (formerly known as Google Capital), the strategic investment arm of Google’s corporate parent Alphabet, and takes the valuation of Lyft up to $11bn.

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Posted by Oliver Wainwright

Her practice beat Foster, Gehry and Piano to clinch London’s new £250m Centre for Music. She talks about fuelling gentrification – and why arts buildings have to be more than corporate baubles

‘We’ve never stopped being rebellious,” says Liz Diller, founding partner of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the New York architects who have just been selected to design London’s new concert hall, the £250m Centre for Music. “But now we are operating in a stealthier way. Rather than trying to kick the establishment walls down, we’re walking in through the front door.”

To reach the hallowed entrance of London’s cultural establishment, they skipped past fellow competitors Norman Foster, Frank Gehry, Renzo Piano and a host of other ageing purveyors of big‑budget arts buildings – an unadventurous shortlist, on which the Americans clearly stood out as the most interesting thinkers of the bunch. This will be their first project in the UK, and the stakes are high for the self-styled provocateurs.

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Posted by Guardian readers

Guardian Cities readers on the rise of the shopping mall, rivalry between oil-rich Kazakhstan and its rural neighbours – and even a defence of dictatorship

We received many responses to our callout for readers’ contributions to our special report on the Stans – thanks to all who sent us words or images. While we read and appreciated each submission, we chose to prioritise the voices of those who are from Central Asia, or have lived there.

Guardian Cities is exploring in depth the oft-ignored – and exceedingly difficult to report from – cities of the five Central Asian “Stans”: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, a quarter of a century after they became independent from the former Soviet Union.

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Posted by Andy Hunter

• Everton also lodge complaint with police over supporter’s conduct
• Merseyside police looking into violence at Europa League match

Everton have said they will ban for life the fan who appeared to hit the Lyon goalkeeper Anthony Lopes while holding a young child during a melee at Goodison Park on Thursday.

The club said they had identified the supporter following an internal investigation into the disturbances and registered a formal complaint against the individual with Merseyside Police.

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Posted by Paul Laity

The Tales of the City author on his past as a closeted young conservative and his fears over America’s ‘fascist regime’

Armistead Maupin is divorcing his family – that’s how he puts it. The particular problem is his brother, Tony, a Donald Trump supporter with a fondness for the Confederate flag. “That’s what Facebook has done,” Maupin tells me: you see a family member’s page “and you want no part of it any more. Life is too short to pretend the poison isn’t there. Their religion and their politics automatically make me, as a gay man, a second-class citizen. So fuck it.”

Maupin (pronounced “Mawpin”), whose much-loved Tales of the City novels are soon to have an updated treatment on Netflix, has long made a distinction between his problematic biological family and his “logical family” – close friends and soulmates. The idea was expressed in fiction by Anna Madrigal, the transgender matriarch of the Tales, who gathers around her a familial group of misfit tenants at 28 Barbary Lane, San Francisco. Now the author has chosen Logical Family as the title for his long-awaited memoir.

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Posted by sally

‘Inequality is receiving increasing attention from social scientists and policy-makers alike. Whilst criminal justice scholars have long recognised that levels of inequality correlate with rates of crime and punishment, the causal mechanisms underlying these correlations are less well understood. Building on recent comparative and historical research on the institutional, cultural and political-economic factors shaping crime and punishment, this conference aims to advance understanding of whether, and if so how and why, social and economic inequality influences levels and types of crime and punishment, and conversely the impact of different levels and types of crime and punishment on various forms of inequality.’

Date: 7th-8th December 2017, 9.30am-5.00pm

Location: The British Academy, 10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH

Charge: See website for details

More information can be found here.

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Posted by sally

‘This paper considers some of the ways in which minor jurisprudences might provide a training in the conduct of the office of Jurisprudent of London (if such an office is still in use). Since the 1990s minor jurisprudences have emphasised variation and dissonance in relation major institutional and critical forms of jurisprudence. They have done so by finding and providing alternate sources, training and purpose in the instruction of the conduct of lawful relations. Reporting, rather loosely, on the writings of Peter Goodrich, Panu Minkkinen and Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihaloppous, this paper considers some of the ways minor jurisprudences recommend caring for the conduct of lawful relations of a place. The motivating conceit of this paper follows the understanding that London bears or carries a jurisprudence and that this can be studied through an engagement with the material ordering of the city. The paper reports back on research conducted between 2013-2017 on encounters of lawful relations along the TfL 345 bus route from Peckham bus Station to South Kensington.’

Date: 1st November 2017, 1.00-2.30pm

Location: RUS 101, Birkbeck, University Of London, 30 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DT

Charge: Free, registration required

More information can be found here.

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Posted by sally

‘A term would be implied into an option agreement, requiring the purchaser/developer of a plot of land to sell the properties that he had newly constructed, within a reasonable period of time, so held the High Court. The clause was necessary as a matter of business efficacy and without it the option agreement lacked commercial coherence. The Court also deemed the clause to be so obvious that it went without saying. (Marks & Spencer PLC v BNP Paribas Securities Services [2015] UKSC 72; [2016] AC 742 considered).’

Full Story

Tanfield Chambers, 12th October 2017

Source: www.tanfieldchambers.co.uk

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Posted by sally

‘In November in conjunction with the Legal Practice Management Association(LPMA), the Bar Standards Board are running a workshop at the Annual Bar Conference and Young Bar Conference 2017 titled ‘Transparency and feedback the future of legal services.’

Date: 4th November 2017, 1.50-3.00pm

Location: Westminster Park Plaza 200 Westminster Bridge Road London SE1 7UT

Charge: See website for details

More information can be found here.

August 2017

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