ewx: (penguin)

We went climbing on Stanage Edge, a lengthy escarpment in the Peak District.

Climbing. We mostly stuck to Mod and Diff routes. For the first few days we managed a lead and a second each; much of the rest of the time was consumed with false starts and getting lost trying to find the next route we wanted to do. We had nice weather and beautiful scenery though. For the last couple of days our productivity roughly doubled, partly a result of more effective navigation but probably also “getting into the swing” of it. On Sunday Matthew and Sally joined us which made for a good end to an already excellent week.

160917-0364.jpg

N looks down.

Other Activities. Friday was the only day that was seriously wet during the day and we went to Chatsworth House, the seat of the Dukes of Devonshire even today. In local terms it’s kind of like Wimpole but on a rather grander scale. Its continued noble occupation has resulted in the accumulation of contemporary art as well as the usual stately home standbys, although excepting the photography I didn’t rate much of it. It’s also substantially covered in scaffolding and sheeting at the moment due to extensive renovation works; apart from the occasional drilling sounds (which based on conversation maybe annoyed the staff more than they did us) this didn’t really impact on our visit, though if you want a clear view of the whole exterior then maybe you should postpone your visit until this is finished.

160916-0363.jpg

I kind of want Mallory Ortberg to caption this.

We also made it to Sheffield Hallam Parkrun, where I chipped a few seconds off my PB. I’m not sure how comparable it is with Cambridge, though. Doing a 5km run in the morning coincided with the uptick in our climbing productivity, which N didn’t consider a coincidence.

Accommodation. We stayed at the North Lees campsite, which is a pleasant 10m walk from the road below Stanage Edge (more to the rock, depending which bit you aim for and how lost you get). Slightly spartan but it did the job. It was mostly fairly empty, only really getting crowded at the weekend. Generally the first thing we heard on waking was sheep.

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The purple sleeping bag is N’s, surprising nobody.

The nearest village is Hathersage, which was a pleasant enough walk in the light though a bit dicey coming back in the dark. We tried two of the three pubs for dinner, returning to the Scotsman’s Pack for a second visit and eating once at the nevertheless perfectly acceptable Plough Inn and one of the two local curry places, Maazi.

Driving. I haven’t owned a car for more than a decade and until very recently hadn’t driven one for around half as long. For this trip we hired a car and mostly got on well, though I thoroughly disliked the single-track lanes around the campsite.

160912-0275.jpg

Vroom!

Cars have changed in the (mumble) years since the previous car I drove left the factory. Six forward gears is an obvious enough evolutionary step and I was vaguely aware of start-stop but I’d not expected the electronic handbrake, nor had I expected the car to tell me when to shift gear - something it was generally right about on the motorways, but I thought less reliable when getting round those narrow lanes.

Photos. There are lots more photos on flickr. I made some videos while climbing although I think they’ll be of more interest for analyzing gear placement than general interest.

ewx: (penguin)
We went to http://clipnclimbcambridge.co.uk/. As a quick look at the website will make clear this isn't a traditional climbing wall - instead of the usual rock-like holds there is a broad variety of (mostly plastic) constructions. The gallery on the website gives some idea and a lot of the routes in the video turn up in Cambridge.

It’s aimed at a general audience of children and adults, not just experienced climbers - there’s no need for climbing shoes, and harnesses are provided. (If you have one, don’t bother bringing it, they won’t let you use it.)

We enjoyed it though going on an extremely hot day wasn’t the best of plans; the only concession to cooling possible was some fans in the corners. I managed most of the routes although a few defeated me in their harder versions (most of them have two or three difficulty levels). In some cases the biggest difficulty was sweat making plastic holds slippery - I had to use slightly awkward grips to stay held on reliably.

The staff insist on doing all the clipping in and out (understandably given the inexperienced intended audience). All the routes have auto belays; among other things this means that usual rest between climbs while belaying someone else didn’t exist l-)

I thought it was quite expensive for what we got; specifically, for an hour climbing we actually slightly paid more than our regular trips which includes a train journey. Still, we had a lot of fun.

Tryfan

Aug. 9th, 2015 05:56 pm
ewx: (photos)
S + Cannon

Goats hiding from the wet under the Cannon on the way up. More of the goats.

More photos )

More pictures from Sunday.

Mynydd Twr

Aug. 9th, 2015 01:29 pm
ewx: (climbing)


Leading means taking the rope up and inserting gear into the rock. In the event of a fall (which didn't happen) the facts that the rope goes through the gear and S is at the bottom controlling the rope would limit how far N could fall.

S also climbed between us (explaining why the rope is different in the video below) but I didn't record that.

Another video, plus photos )

More pictures.

Mountains

Aug. 2nd, 2015 07:26 pm
ewx: (penguin)
✓ Holyhead
✓ Tryfan

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